Tag Archives: Ukrainian fascists

Canada | Canadian taxpayers money backdrop far-right violence Ukraine

By Julia Rozenblat

The state is an apparatus of violence and coercion. So Vladimir Lenin claimed, and this is one of his theses rarely questioned by critics, even the strongest of them.

If, in the course of some processes, one state is demolished or its territory is seized by a neighbouring state, another state necessarily emerges in its place. Sometimes, though too rarely, an entirely new state could emerge promoting higher social values. This was the case throughout the twentieth century. But in today’s world, in particular in the case of Ukraine, the impossible has become possible. Ukraine has introduced a new type of state, with a power base among independent groups of militarized “patriots” and who the government relies upon for much of its repressive apparatus.

Ukraine | Battle for historical memory is carried on in Ukraine

On May 9, Ukraine traditionally celebrates the day of victory in the Great Patriotic War. However, the fascists, who came to power, are trying to ban this holiday. They can not do this openly, so they came up with an alternative holiday on May 8, and try to terrorize and intimidate people who go to the streets on May 9.
However, the people do not give up and respond with the action “Immortal Regiment”. During the action, the descendants of Soviet soldiers march through the streets with portraits of their grandfathers and great-grandfathers.
To prevent the procession of the “Immortal Regiment” in 2017, the Kiev regime began to prepare well in advance. May 5, the site “Immortal Regiment – Ukraine” was blocked without a court decision. Contrary to the anti-communist laws, it was forbidden to use any Soviet symbolism associated with the Victory on May 9. A special irritation under Kiev regime is the use of the Guards or St. George ribbon. It is not officially banned, but for its use, the police arrests people.
The Ukrainian police do not say how many people celebrated the Victory Day. According to their data, more than 2 thousand mass events took place on the territory of Ukraine on May 8 and 9, about 700 thousand citizens took part in it. However, on May 8, a small number of official events took place, and mass street festivals were held on May 9. Despite all the efforts of the Kiev regime on this day, hundreds of thousands of conscious citizens of Ukraine came to the streets, and the government used its last resort to stop them – the fascists. Throughout Ukraine, a real battle unfolded for the historical memory.

Ukraine | Odessa residents commemorate the victims of the May massacre

May 2, 2014 Ukrainian fascists burned several dozen residents of Odessa who opposed the establishment of the ultra-right regime in Ukraine and demanded the transformation of Ukraine into a federal state. Since then, Odessa residents have massively commemorated the victims of fascist terror.
The Kiev regime traditionally perceives such actions as a manifestation of civil protest and is furious because Odessa is politically disloyal. In this regard, every year approaching May 2, it perceives as a threat to the domination and conducts campaigns of intimidation. 2017 was no exception.
Two weeks before the commemoration, the Council of Mothers of the May 2 wrote to American human rights defenders:

Israel | Ukrainian Jews outraged over ‘Holocaust Cabaret’ in Kiev

A theater in Kiev provoked protest Tuesday from the local Jewish community after displaying a sign above its entrance proclaiming the title of an upcoming play, “The Trials of John Demjanjuk: A Holocaust Cabaret.”

Poland | Guest workers migration as a back side of Bandera glorification

Polish left scientists, trade unionists and politicians discussed the problems of current Polish-Ukrainian relation with their colleges from Ukraine and Tunisia. On April 20 in Warsaw they gathered in the round table to examine Ukrainian experience of last three years. Well-known Polish political and public figures, scientists, journalists were invited to the round table as participants in the discussion. Among them were doctor Janusz Fuchs, the leader of Polish socialists Peter Ikonovich, Professor Jacek Kochan and many others.