Tag Archives: Poroshenko

Ukraine | Georgian ex-president Saakashvili arrested in Ukraine

Ex-Georgian citizen, ex-president and ex-governor of Odessa region Michael Saakashvili was arrested by Ukrainian secret police on December 8. It was the second attempt. The first one was not fruitful. Firstly Saakashvili was arrested at the mid of the day while opposition protest took place in the capital of Ukraine. But supporters of a former Georgian politician encircled a car of secret police, broke inside and liberated their leader. It was humiliating for police so next time it prepared better and arrested Saakashvili at night in private flat. His supporters were unable to prevent arrest.

“The West Backed the Wrong Man in Ukraine”

Western powers revise their attitude to Kiev regime in Ukraine. The clear sign of a new political line is Bloomberg. Its columnist Leonid Bershidsky states they choose a wrong man as Ukrainian president.

It’s become increasingly clear that Obama-era U.S. politicians backed the wrong people in Ukraine. President Petro Poroshenko’s moves to consolidate his power now include sidelining the anti-corruption institutions he was forced to set up by Ukraine’s Western allies.

 Poroshenko, who had briefly served as Ukraine’s foreign minister, looked worldlier than his predecessor, the deposed Viktor Yanukovych, and spoke passable English. He and his first prime minister, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, knew what the U.S. State Department and Vice President Joe Biden, who acted as the Obama administration’s point man on Ukraine, wanted to hear. So, as Ukraine emerged from the revolutionary chaos of January and February 2014, the U.S., and with it the EU, backed Poroshenko and Yatsenyuk as Ukraine’s next leaders. Armed with this support, not least with promises of major technical aid and International Monetary Fund loans, they won elections, posing as Westernizers who would lead Ukraine into Europe. But their agendas turned out to be more self-serving.

While Ukraine was in existential need of Western money, Poroshenko and his political allies followed the conditions attached to the aid. Among other things, parliament voted to set up an independent National Anti-Corruption Bureau (NABU) that was supposed to investigate graft, and a special anti-corruption prosecutor.

 Gradually, however, it became clear that though the agency and the prosecutor could make loud noises and investigate hundreds of cases (about 400 so far), they found it hard to make charges stick because the largely unreformed court system pushed back. Ukraine’s European and U.S. allies demanded that a special anti-corruption court be set up. Poroshenko, however, has been lukewarm about the idea, pointing out that few countries had such an institution. Despite repeated Western demands, backed by a group of young pro-Western legislators, Poroshenko still hasn’t submitted a legislative proposal on the court — even though the Venice Commission, which analyzes legislation for the EU, has provided detailed recommendations on what the bill should look like.

At the same time, Prosecutor General Yury Lutsenko, a close Poroshenko ally, began an open war against NABU. An agent of the Anti-Corruption Bureau was detained last week while trying to hand over a bribe to a migration service official, and the bureau’s offices were searched. NABU chief Artem Sytnyk claimed in response that the bribe was part of a sting operation Lutsenko hadn’t known about. That didn’t stop Lutsenko from continuing to attack Sytnyk and his bureau, accusing them of illegal operations and unauthorized cooperation with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation.

“We remember the atrocities in Odessa”

October 14, 2017 in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, a protest action was held in front of the Ukrainian embassy. The immediate reason for the action was the law on education, which infringes the rights of Bulgarians living in Ukraine. However, the protesters approached the issue extensively. On homemade placards they wrote: “Children are killed in the Donbas, innocent people are killed. Wake up. Stop Fascism!”, “Ukraine has no place in the EU”, “We remember the atrocities in Odessa”, “Tribute Poroshenko” and others. Three protest declarations were read. The protest lasted two and a half hours, accompanied by speeches of participants, the singing of patriotic songs and vigilant police guard. At the end of the rally numerous black balls were released into the sky in memory of people killed by the fascist junta during the events in Odessa.
The organizers of the protest were the civil movement for the left association “NDLO”, the movement of Russophiles named after Petko Voyvoda, the movement “Che Guevara” and a number of other leftist groups.
In the final resolution, the rally participants expressed concern about the fate of the Bulgarians living in Ukraine, supported the refusal of Ukrainian Bulgarians to participate in the civil war on the side of Kiev and expressed concern over the preparation of the “law on the occupied territories”, which makes Kiev an aggressor against its own country.
The rally participants urged the Ukrainian authorities to stop lawlessness and stigmatization against their own Ukrainian people, change the policy towards national minorities and, in particular, the Bulgarians, and adhere to the Minsk agreements, which, according to the rally participants, are the only correct way out of the Ukrainian crisis.

Ukraine | CPJ calls on Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko to reaffirm his commitment to ensuring journalists’ safety

The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), an independent press freedom advocacy organization, addressed a letter to Ukrainian president Poroshenko. The Committee is deeply disappointed by the lack of progress in the investigation into Pavel Sheremet’s death. “Now, we feel compelled to write to express our deep concern about actions taken by Ukraine’s state security service (SBU) that pose a significant threat to press freedom in Ukraine.”

Ukraine | The false friends of the Ukrainian people

By Julia Rozenblat

Poroshenko has voiced many words of gratitude to foreign governments. Sometimes, there is much humor in his international courtesies showing his appreciation. Like his performance during a visit to Australia in December 2014. He stopped and bowed to a military guard of honor before entering the Australian Parliament.