Tag Archives: working class

Greece | The High Cost of Denying Class War

The rise of populism on both sides of the Atlantic is being investigated psychoanalytically, culturally, anthropologically, aesthetically, and of course in terms of identity politics. The only angle left unexplored is the one that holds the key to understanding what is going on: the unceasing class war waged against the poor since the late 1970s.

USA | The Untold Story of How Immigrants Turned the Wobblies into a Global Force

Declaring, “an injury to one is an injury to all,” the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) upended and forever changed the labor movement a little over a century ago. The Wobblies’ commitment to organizing workers on an industry-wide basis, their cynicism about legislative action and electoral politics, their aversion to signed contracts and their preference for sudden strikes remain fascinating subjects for labor studies. Their multiculturalism, anti-racism and pioneering bohemian approach to God, country and sex remain a rich vein to be mined for cultural studies.

Russia | The Relevance of the Russian Revolution Today

Leon Trotsky, co-leader with Vladimir Lenin of the 1917 October Revolution in Russia, famously argued that the “Russian Question” was key to the standing of every party on earth that claimed allegiance to the heritage of revolutionary socialist politics.

Humanitarianism Destroys Politicality An interview with Sandro Mezzadra by Davor Konjikušić

Sandro Mezzadra, Professor of Political Theory at the University of Bologna and adjunct researcher at the Institute for Culture and Society of the University of Western Sydney, was recently a guest speaker at the public discussion entitled, “Remember Gastarbeiters – So that You Don’t Forget the Reality in which You Live,” in Nova Gallery, Zagreb. On this occasion, we spoke with professor Mezzadra about his last book, which he co-authored with Brett Neilson, Border as Method, or, the Multiplication of Labor (2013).

La révolte des ouvriers serbes face à leurs patrons étrangers

Qualifiés, bon marché, peu protégés par la loi, les ouvriers serbes ont tout pour plaire aux multinationales étrangères. Mais la grogne monte parmi les travailleurs du plus grand pays des Balkans, candidat à l’Union européenne.

La grève des ouvriers de Fiat fin juin a marqué les esprits. Les 2.400 ouvriers de l’usine de Kragujevac dans le centre du pays demandaient une hausse de leur salaire de plus de 18%. Une demande qui peut sembler exorbitante pour qui ignore que cela aurait fait passer leur traitement à… 370 euros mensuels. Soit 30 euros en dessous du salaire moyen de ce pays, qui négocie son adhésion à l’Union européenne.