Tag Archives: austerity

Greece | The calamity of austerity in Greece

by Niki Best

While the troika celebrated the end of its Greek bailout programme, the Transnational Institute TNI was busy reporting on the devastating impact of its enforced austerity.

Greece | Des profits sur la Grèce

par Eric Toussaint

J’ai perdu beaucoup de plumes dans la crise de la dette depuis 2010. Ce qui ne m’empêchera pas de voler de mes propres ailes dès aujourd’hui. Et les créanciers de faire encore des bénéfices sur mon dos. Je suis, je suis ? La poule aux œufs d’or grecque.

Greece | Syriza’s Repressive Turn

Alexis Tsipras’s government promised to end austerity. Now it’s defending the banks against people evicted from their homes — and persecuting those who protest.
Many on the international left believe that things in Greece are slowly improving, and that the Syriza government remains a left-wing force that is protecting the interests of workers and the poor even despite very difficult conditions. For those who accept this view, recent developments in the country will come as a nasty surprise.

Argentina | IMF: Argentina World Economy Weakening From US Trade War

The fund says Argentina’s economy will shrink by 2.6 percent in 2018 because of austerity measures, and global growth is contracting from trade wars.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) said Tuesday that the Latin American economy will grow less than expected, mainly because Argentina, the region’s third largest money maker, is in an economic crisis.

Greece | Greece still under the yoke of its illegitimate debt

by Anouk Renaud

On Friday 22 June 2018, after night-long negotiations, the Eurogroup (meeting of the finance ministers of the eurozone, along with representatives of the IMF and the ECB) announced with great fanfare / pomp and circumstances, a new agreement concerning Greece. It is supposed to be a “historic” agreement that would sound the death knell of the Greek crisis. [1] Now all the media are saying that Greece “is turning a page,” that “the Greek people can smile again,” that it marks “the end of the Greek crisis,” and that “Greece had settled its debt problem.” [2]