Tag Archives: protests

Germany | Resisting the G20 in Hamburg: Second Day

Resistance to the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany continued to the second day.

After days of reckless unilateral escalation in which the police attacked protesters and residents of this rebellious city, last night Hamburg fiercely resisted the occupation of the police and the world leaders with militant demonstrations and spontaneous action. Great masses of people came out to their neighborhoods to show that Hamburg cannot be intimidated. This morning began with the burning of several cars, an attack on a police station, a blockade of the port, and people pushing in close to the complex hosting the G20.

Germany | Dozens injured as anti-G20 protesters clash with Hamburg police ‘like never before’

An anti-G20 rally in Hamburg has erupted into a violent confrontation between police and protesters. Dozens of officers have been injured by rioters as sporadic clashes on the streets of the German city continued into the night.

Europe’s youth don’t care to vote — but they’re ready to join a mass revolt

Young Europeans are sick of the status quo in Europe. And they’re ready to take to the streets to bring about change, according to a recent survey.

Around 580,000 respondents in 35 countries were asked the question: Would you actively participate in large-scale uprising against the generation in power if it happened in the next days or months? More than half of 18- to 34-year-olds said yes.

More and more people are joining protests across Serbia

By Pavle Ilic

Political reality tends not to care about life plans of individuals. And so, as I was writing up a report from a student conference in Ljubljana on April 3, a comrade hit me up on Facebook asking, “Are you going to the protest?”

Romania | What does it happen in Romania? The January 2017 protests

by Ana Bazac

On 18 January 2017, the Government has imposed two projects of Emergency Ordinances: stipulating the pardon of the most important corruptions acts, and abolishing the conflict of interest and the abuse of office as corruption guilt, as well as any possibility of recovery of the material prejudices from the culprits. The two ordinances had, certainly, in view many members of the political “elite” – and this “dedication” has generated legitimate emotions – but people were indignant against the open infringement of the principles of the law which constitute a necessary form of their defence. The law is, obviously (and people understand this), the result of relations of forces, but to annul just the elements which represent the public control over the rulers and allow their punishment is a sign of extreme arrogance on behalf of them.