Tag Archives: neuroscience

That music playing in your head is a real conundrum for scientists

Researchers at EPFL can now see what happens in our brains when we hear music in our heads. The researchers hope that in time their findings will be used to help people who have lost the ability to speak.

When we listen to , different parts of our brain process different information – such as high and – so that our auditory perception of the sounds matches what we hear. It’s easy to study the of someone who is listening to a song, for instance, as we have the technology to record and analyze the neural responses that each sound produces as it is heard. It’s much more complicated, however, to try and understand what happens in our brain when we hear music in our heads without any auditory stimulation. As with analyzing real music, the brain’s responses have to be linked to a given sound. But when the music is in our heads, that sound doesn’t actually exist – or at least our ears don’t hear it. Using a novel approach, researchers with EPFL’s Defitech Foundation Chair in Human-Machine Interface (CNBI) were able to analyze what happens in our brains when we hum in our heads.

Select Memories Can Be Erased, Leaving Others Intact

New study of snail neurons suggests memories that trigger anxiety, PTSD could be ‘erased’ without affecting normal memory of past events

Different types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and McGill University and published today in Current Biology.

Peabody Essex Museum hires neuroscientist to enhance visitor experience

For decades, museums have sought a minimalist approach when it comes to their galleries, hanging art on clean white walls so viewers can focus intently on the work before them. But what if they’ve been doing it all wrong?

To answer that question, the Peabody Essex Museum is taking what is being hailed as an unprecedented step in the museum world: hiring a neuroscientist to help apply the tenets of modern brain science to enhance the museum-going experience.

Men and women show equal ability at recognizing faces

Despite conventional wisdom that suggests women are better than men at facial recognition, Penn State psychologists found no difference between men and women in their ability to recognize faces and categorize facial expressions.

In the study, the researchers used behavioral tests, as well as neuroimaging, to investigate whether there is an influence of biological sex on facial recognition, according to Suzy Scherf, assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience.

USA | Robo-suit and virtual reality reverse some paralysis in people with spinal cord injuries

Texoskeletonwo years ago, just before leading a controversial demonstration at the World Cup in which a paralyzed man in a futuristic-looking exoskeleton controlled by his brain appeared to kick a soccer ball, neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis hinted in an interview that his research team would aim for something equally impressive to grab the world’s attention during the 2016 Summer Olympics in his native Brazil.