Tag Archives: Korean conflict

NY Times Pours Linguistic Gasoline on North Korean-U.S. Negotiations

by KJ Noh

On the heels of the historic June 12th Trump-Kim Singapore Summit that de-escalated tensions between North Korea and the United States, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made his third visit to North Korea to move the negotiations for denuclearization and security on the peninsula forward. He met with his North Korean counterpart, Vice Chair of the Party Central Committee, Kim Young Chol, on July 6 and 7, for intensive negotiations. At the end of the meeting, on leaving Pyongyang, Secretary Pompeo declared that the summit had been conducted in good faith and that he had “made progress on almost all central matters.” Without divulging details, he stated there was more work to be done, which would be continued by working groups on both sides and that a follow up meeting had been scheduled.

The North Korea Summit Through the Looking Glass

As much of the world celebrates a modest step towards peace in Korea, Western pundits seem to be panicking.

North Korea Has the Upper Hand in Negotiations with Trump

by Vijay Prashad

North Korea’s Kim Jong-un met with Donald Trump of the United States in Singapore. This was the first meeting of the heads of government of these two countries. The United States has been at war with North Korea since 1950. Three years into that war, which destroyed most of the infrastructure in North Korea, the two countries—and South Korea—agreed to a halt in the active fighting. But the war did not end. It remains intact. A massive military deployment by the United States at the edge of North Korea maintains the fear inside the Korean Peninsula of annihilation. This is what makes the summit between Kim and Trump so important. Threats of war are now at a low point.

DPRK-U.S. Summit in Singapore: Full joint statement

Following the DPRK-U.S. Summit in Singapore on June 12, the leaders of the two countries released the following joint statement:

“President Donald J. Trump of the United States of America and Chairman Kim Jong Un of the State Affairs Commission of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) held a first, historic summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018.

Kim’s Letter to Trump. The Singapore Summit Is On, Without the Signing of a Formal Peace Agreement?

By Michel Chossudovsky

While the Singapore June 12 summit is back on, will it result in a bilateral peace agreement? 

It is highly unlikely that Pyongyang will cave in to US demands which require a unilateral process of “denuclearization” on the part of the DPRK. Meanwhile, Donald Trump remains committed to his 1.3 trillion dollar nuclear weapons program which is casually heralded as a means to ensure America’s national security, at tax payers expense.