Tag Archives: Hungary

Hungary | We stand with the Archive. Do you?

On 24 May 2018 the last research associate of the Georg Lukács Archives of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences was banned from the Archives after twenty-eight years of employment. Despite local and international protest, the Academy, with the assistance of its own library, closed the archives of the only world-renowned Hungarian philosopher, which has existed since 1972. The Archives ceased to exist as a resource for international researchers, by replacing the locks on its doors.

Hungary | “Almost nobody seems to care” Interview with Gáspár Miklós Tamás

In an interview, Hungarian philosopher Gáspár Miklós Tamás tells the Dissident Blog why freedom of speech and democracy are in decline in his home country.

Hungary | Solidarity action and an antifascist demonstration held in Budapest

Hungarian civil groups headed by the Hungarian United Left (MEBAL) called for a demonstration for 10 a.m. on 8th October 2017 in the heart of the previous Jewish ghetto of Budapest (i. e. on Klauzal Square, where 3 thousand killed Jews were piled up in 1944) in order to protest against the presently very powerful autocracy of the right-wing ruling power of FIDESZ and KDNP and the brutal police violence committed against Attila Vajnai, President of the European Left Workers Party 2006.

Hungary | Lukács Statue has been removed and the Lukács Archives closed in Budapest

On 28 March, the statue of renowned Marxist philosopher George Lukács (1890-1971) was removed from Saint Stephen’s park in the 13th district of Budapest. The sculpture, commissioned by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and made by sculptor Imre Varga in 1985, was erected to praise Lukács for his contributions to philosophy.

Hungary | The Never-Ending Lukács Debate

By G. M. Tamás

Before 1914, Lukács’s early works were received with great antipathy by the literary establishment in Hungary; they were found to be too “German” — that is to say, too philosophical, not impressionistic and positivistic enough. That was only the beginning, of course; from then on, Lukács would be attacked from the right incessantly, all his life. Lukács didn’t fare much better in leftist circles, either. When his most important book, History and Class Consciousness (1923), came out, it was savaged by both the Second and the Third International. It wasn’t to be republished until the 1960s. Lukács was given an ultimatum: if he wanted to stay in the Party, he had to repudiate the book and subject himself to self-criticism, which is what he eventually did.