Category Archives: Georgia

Les Etats-Unis unissent l’Arménie et l’Azerbaïdjan contre l’Iran

Les États-Unis tentent de créer dans la coalition anti-iranienne sans précédent Caucase du Sud, réconciliant Arménie et l’Azerbaïdjan – vieux rivaux, rival sur le territoire contesté depuis des siècles. Un aspect clé de la conclusion de la paix, selon l’idéologie américaine, devrait être un transfert progressif du Haut-Karabakh à l’Azerbaïdjan. Nikol Pashinyan, qui est arrivé au pouvoir en Arménie est manifestement prêt à prendre cette mesure sans précédent pour obtenir le soutien politique de Washington. Cependant, les experts azerbaïdjanaisse réfèrent à ce scénario avec un certain degré de scepticisme.

Tbilisi City Court sentences in absentia ex-President Saakashvili to 6 years

Tbilisi City Court has sentenced former President of Georgia Mikheil Saakashvili to six years in prison in absentia for exceeding official powers, violence and deliberate damage to heath over the high profile violence case against opposition lawmaker Valeri Gelashvili.

FROM A SUGAR FACTORY TO A BITCOIN MINE – NO COUNTRY FOR A WORKER

This is the tragedy of our economic development in Georgia. Through free trade agreements, FDI, and idiotic like embracement of every new technological innovation by the government, the actual people in Georgia are unemployed or working poor, in debt and trying to leave the country as soon as they can. In Agara, the employees are staying to fight for a chance to work.

The Pentagon Bio-Weapons

by Dilyana  Gaytandzhieva  

Dilyana Gaytandzhieva is a Bulgarian investigative journalist and Middle East Correspondent. Over the last two years she has published a series of revealed reports on weapons smuggling. In the past year she came under pressure from the Bulgarian National Security Agency and was fired from her job in the Bulgarian newspaper Trud Daily without explanation. Despite this, Dilyana continues her investigations. Her current report provides an overview of Pentagon’s vigour in the development of biological weapons.

Even 8,000 years ago, a meal without wine was like a day without sunshine

Pliny the Elder knew that truth comes out in it. Aeschylus called it the mirror of the mind. Robert Louis Stevenson said it was bottled poetry. Mark Twain compared the books of great geniuses to it. It is no wonder that wine—which perfectly complements food, inhibits inhibitions, and alters perceptions—has been inseparable from civilization from time immemorial. But when, exactly, “immemorial” started is still being investigated.