Monthly Archives: May 2017

Why terrorists attack concert halls

When a suicide bomber detonated explosives in the Manchester Arena in the United Kingdom, killing concertgoers as they filed out of pop star Ariana Grande’s show, he joined a particularly insidious tradition of attacks on entertainment spaces. The killers who carry out such acts of terrorism aren’t simply launching assaults on Western culture. They’re attempting to destroy the particular freedom that comes from surrendering to art, exploiting the very vulnerability that accompanies that surrender.

Mind-controlled device helps stroke patients retrain brains to move paralyzed hands

Stroke patients who learned to use their minds to open and close a device fitted over their paralyzed hands gained some control over their hands, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

By mentally controlling the device with the help of a brain-computer interface, participants trained the uninjured parts of their brains to take over functions previously performed by injured areas of the brain, the researchers said.

Greece | Evidence of Parcel Bomb Against Former Greek PM Leads to Known Terrorist Group

After collecting evidence from the scene of the parcel bomb explosion in the car of former prime minister Lucas Papademos, Greek police suspect that the perpetrators are linked with the Conspiracy of the Cells of Fire terrorist group.

Russia | Kremlin ignores freedom of conscience violation

Two weeks ago Russian court sentenced a young man Ruslan Sokolovsky, who was carried away by the game “PokeGo” and caught Pokemon in the church. The court found him guilty of insulting the feelings of believers and sentenced to a conditional conclusion. The basis for the verdict was not only the very fact of entertainment in the Orthodox Church, but also video recordings from his personal blog.
The Russian service of the BBC has brought several fragments from the verdict. Among them were: “[Sokolovsky’s videos] contain information that contains signs of insulting the feelings of adherents of Christianity and Islam, formed through the denial of the existence of God,” [the blogger] denies the existence of Jesus and the Prophet Muhammad, thus committed the crime envisaged in part 1 of Article 148 of the Criminal Code. ”
The verdict aroused indignation of the authoritative Russian journalist Vladimir Pozner, who does not hide his atheistic convictions. In his blog he wrote that he wants to get an explanation, does he have a legal right to be an atheist in Russia or is it criminal? “Perhaps the Patriarch Cyril will say whether I offend his religious feelings, claiming that there is no God? Perhaps the chairman of the Constitutional Court will tell me if I have the right to think what I think and express what I say? Maybe the head of state will make it clear whether the court is waiting for me,” – the journalist wrote.
In response, a spokesman for the Russian Orthodox Church expressed doubts in the depth of the journalist’s intelligence, and Dmitry Peskov, the Russian presidential press secretary, refused to condemn the violation of the principle of freedom of conscience, which the Russian court admitted.
Instead, Dmitry Peskov refused to comment on Pozner’s question at all. According to him, this is a rhetorical question that falls within the competence of Russian courts and has nothing to do with the president.

Senior UN official appeals for aid to stop ‘unprecedented’ spread of cholera in Yemen

With more than 100,000 people in Yemen believed to be at risk for cholera, the top United Nations humanitarian official in the country is appealing to Governments for urgent financial and political support.

“Cholera continues to spread at an unprecedented rate throughout Yemen affecting men, women, and children who have for more than two years withstood the consequences of a conflict that is collapsing institutions and social safety nets,” the UN humanitarian coordinator in the country, Jamie McGoldrick.